David Bonetti, Part Three

One of David’s superb characteristics is that he made sure if you hung out with him you would learn art information that was exciting and important to you. During that same St. Louis visit, he ensured we went to what he called the most essential exhibit in the city for me. Turned out to be a small gallery featuring a bunch of early drawings by Jim Nutt (one of the most perfect artist names, ever) including most of the items on this page.

I was captivated and transported. I knew nothing of Nutt (love the phrases that happen spontaneously) barely more about The Hairy Who than they had a super-cool name. Now we’ve got three books about Nutt and the Hairys and a lot more savvy about a major part of early Pop Surrealism. Thanks to David.

David Bonetti, Part Two

When we visited him in St. Louis, we took the outstanding walking tour from his home. He showed us the house where one of my prime mentors/inspirations/parasitic-demons grew up, William S. Burroughs. Bit grand but unassuming, except for the peculiar sculptures that lined the walkway up to the house. (Obviously inhabited by people more like the author and less like the guy who invented the adding machine.)

“They insisted there should be no sidewalk notification of what this was,” said David, “because they were afraid of the hordes of weirdos that would show up all the time.”

Another obit:

http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/arts-and-theatre/david-bonetti-former-post-dispatch-arts-critic-dies-at/article_da50d5f6-3ed3-5161-86af-e9858c1d3631.html

Manga Characters I Know But Don’t Know

I picked up this catalog called 100 Manga Artists because I realized I knew only about 30. For a research break, I try to absorb three new ones every day. One peculiar phenomenon is that I realized I knew several characters by the enormously successful Fujio Akatsuka— such as Bakabon’s Papa, crazy semi-Mod Iyami, and even the outrageous speaking cat Nyarome without ever reading a translated comic.

The Muse Hasn’t Gone Away — Merely Changed and Semi-Retired

When I regularly wrote poems, their beginnings were effortless, pure pleasure. The lines would start blooming in my head and I would write them down soon as possible. Sometimes took two or three sessions to complete a work. I would reread many times and do refinements and revisions, but those first flashes were all fun.

Only got a half-dozen (not-great) poems in the last 40 years. But occasionally a small piece of writing like a caption or a blurb or a short preview will suddenly start flowing out of the tap in my brain. Happened today when I was driving. Had to keep repeating the thing to myself until I could get to a keyboard. But I didn’t mind a whit.

Check the Document, Not Yer Memory

I have to correct an error I made on this list, by not doing what the title of this post says.

The clear high point for the Swedish rocker Gasolin’ was Gasolin’ 3, not the much milder and more tentative debut.

 

EDIT: Correcting the Correction —

 

No wonder I got confused … there were two versions of their third release. One in Swedish, one in English. Baker produced both. The one that zammed me so much was Gasolin’ (period), the version with lyrics I understand.